29 Ways To Get More Writing Done

Posted by on June 27, 2017

How much writing do you get done every day? What’s a decent word count for you? 500 words? 1000? 5000? A lot will depend on your circumstances, energy levels and whether this is your full-time job, a side hustle or a hobby. But I’ll bet that many of you answered the question, ‘How much writing do you get done each day?’ with the phrase ‘Not enough,’ or something similar.

As freelance writers and indie authors, we’re always looking for ways to get more writing done. Small tweaks can help us up our daily word count and hit our writing goals sooner. Here are a few of the daily writing hacks that help me hit my deadlines and (most of) my personal writing goals.

29 Ways To Get More Writing Done

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Start by reading Write Better, Faster by Monica Leonelle

Even if you’re already a productivity ninja like me (I am too, sort of – I’ve even written my own book on the topic), this will give you specific tips for actually turning out your writing projects faster. I read it recently and it’s a game changer.

Let go of what’s not important

Sometimes goal pruning is more important than goal setting. Are you still working towards something that no longer fires you up? Let it go.

Clear mental clutter

Unfinished writing projects create mental clutter. Either finish them, drop them or file them away deep in the folders of your hard drive to return to later. Assign them a level of priority for when you do have time to get back to them.

Clear digital clutter

Clean up your desktop. Empty your inbox. Unsubscribe from newsletters and blogs. Pare things down to find stuff you can actually use.

Set an intention

It’s a little mental trick that can help you focus on your writing. I blogged about making one word resolutions this New Year. And my word is Create. Your one word resolution can also be your intention. In her book Happy Habits, Vicki Morris suggests you spend a few minutes focusing on your intention every morning. You can do it before you even get out of bed.

Try the 90/90/1 rule

I borrowed this one from the great Robin Sharma (who pretty much wrote the book on how to be great at everything). As he puts in on his website:

“For the next 90 days, devote the first 90 minutes of your work day to the one best opportunity in your life. Nothing else. Zero distractions. Just get that project done. Period.”

Or try Monica Leonelle’s method for dividing up your writing time

She uses a simple grid system to plan her writing day, and she explains it really clearly (with pictures!) here.

Outsource

Or delegate. Everything you can. From editing to cover design to house cleaning. It’s easier than you think, especially if you get it right from the start. Try and spend your time doing what only you can do.

Focus on one thing at a time

FOCUS - Follow One Course Until Successful

Then follow another.

Consider dictating your writing

My esteemed colleague, Monica Leonelle, is getting a lot of shout outs today, but if you’re going to try this you should probably read Dictate Your Book.

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Specific advice for writing productivity, in bite size snippets.

Take breaks

It’s counter intuitive but breaks are productivity essentials. We slow down once we’ve been working for a while and speed up just after a break.

Add variety

Also counter intuitive, but writing all the time isn’t always a recipe for producing more words. Doing something else creative can restore flow when you’re flagging and help you write quicker and better when you return to your project.

Don’t multi-task on creative tasks

Most of what we perceive as multi-tasking is actually task switching, and we lose momentum every time we switch.

Do multi task on automatic tasks

We CAN truly multi-task when we’re doing something very automatic like driving or walking, so that’s a great time to also do something else like listen to podcasts or audio books.

Plan lightly every evening

Knowing your first few tasks for the morning gets you started quicker.

Plan deeply every week

Taking twenty minutes to plan out your week often means you spend less time making decisions over the next seven days and less time firefighting the unexpected (which is probably not that unexpected at all if you think things through at the beginning of the week).

Separate writing and thinking about writing

Think, brainstorm, plot, plan and outline at a separate time than you actually do your writing. That way you always sit down to actually write with a plan of some kind.

Check email and social media twice a day

Then cut it down to once a day, then once a week. I’m kidding. Once or twice a day is fine, and it sounds doable now you’ve considered once a week, doesn’t it?

Take a writing course

Consider a real-world offline one, with homework. Don’t be the kid who has to think of an original excuse for why she didn’t do her homework. Don’t have the time or opportunity for real world courses and classes? Try a virtual course, like Write Your Way to Your First $1K course or the excellent Blog Writing Bootcamp.

Take a one day writing workshop

Where you focus on nothing but writing.

Book a writing retreat

Where you focus on nothing but writing.

Use your downtime wisely

Read something excellent in the genre you’re writing in.

Or use it to research markets

Also known as browsing magazines and websites you want to pitch (sounds almost like leisure time, doesn’t it?).

Or read something about writing

On my nightstand…

Coach Yourself To Writing Success by Bekki Hill

How To Write and Sell Short Stories by Della Galton

Creating Fictional Characters by Howard Lauther

All proving insanely useful.

Take a writing device everywhere

You didn’t really need reminding of that one did you?

Write in three minute bursts

In the commercial break, in the supermarket checkout line, while you’re waiting for the exercise class before yours to finish.

Stockpile ideas

So you always have something to be working on in your three minute bursts. (even if it’s just a character description, a blog post outline or a list of potential article titles).

Love what you do

If you’re not writing enough, make sure you’re in love with your current or main writing project. Even if you have to fit it around your money-making projects, make 2016 the year that you also work on a passion project, every day.

Need some better systems to help you run your freelance career? Check out the Freelance Writer’s Success Kit. Subscribe to my list and you’ll get the chance to grab it for half-price, along with a totally FREE report on Freelance Writing Markets That Pay.

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Comments

  1. Leave a Reply

    Kimsea Sok
    June 28, 2017

    Hello. How are you doing today?

    Hope you’re doing well.

    Writing becomes more difficult, and I’m mostly staring at the notebook with blank paper.

    Yeah. of course, I committed to 1000 words every day, but that isn’t really.

    Many distraction from clients, friends, and blog’s readers put me down.

    I love the 90/90 rules. It sounds interesting to me.

    Oh. I do agree. Bring a writing device to anywhere could raise up the writing productivity.

    As I could remember, I will write more if there is a notebook at the coffee shop.

    Thanks
    Kimsea Sok recently posted…How to Get AdSense Account Approved After Published 4th ArticleMy Profile

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